US Gold

US Gold

The eagle is a base-unit of denomination issued only for gold coinage by the United States Mint based on the original values designated by the Coinage Act of 1792. It has been obsolete as a circulating denomination since 1933. The eagle was the largest of the four main decimal base-units of denomination used for circulating coinage in the United States prior to 1933, the year when gold was withdrawn from circulation.

These four main base-units of denomination were the cent, the dime, the dollar, and the eagle, where a dime is 10 cents, a dollar is 10 dimes, and an eagle is 10 dollars. The eagle base-unit of denomination served as the basis of the gold quarter-eagle (US$ 2.50), the gold half-eagle (US $5), the eagle (US $10), and the double-eagle coins (US $20).

With the exceptions of the gold dollar coin, the gold three-dollar coin, the three-cent nickel, and the five-cent nickel, the unit of denomination of coinage prior to 1933 was conceptually linked to the precious or semi-precious metal that constituted a majority of the alloy used in that coin.

In this regard the United States followed long-standing European practice of different base-unit denominations for different precious and semi-precious metals. In the United States, the cent was the base-unit of denomination in copper. The dime and dollar were the base-units of denomination in silver. The eagle was the base-unit of denomination in gold although, unlike “cent”, “dime” (or “disme”), and “dollar”, gold coins never specified their denomination in units of “eagles”. Thus, a double eagle showed its value as “twenty dollars” rather than “two eagles

US Gold (United States) Coins from the various United States Mints.

Double Eagle, Half Eagle, Quarter Eagle, St Gaudens Double Eagle, St Gaudens Eagle

Indian Head Gold

The Indian Head gold pieces or Pratt-Bigelow gold coins were two coins, identical in design, struck by the United States Mint: a two-and-a-half dollar piece, or quarter eagle, and a five-dollar coin, or half eagle.

The quarter eagle was struck from 1908 to 1915, and then again in 1925–1929, and the half eagle from 1908 to 1916, and then again in 1929. The pieces remain the only US circulating coins with recessed designs. The coins were the final ones for these denominations as coins struck for circulation, ending series which had begun in the 1790s

Gold Double Eagle

The Indian Head gold pieces or Pratt-Bigelow gold coins were two coins, identical in design, struck by the United States Mint: a two-and-a-half dollar piece, or quarter eagle, and a five-dollar coin, or half eagle.

The quarter eagle was struck from 1908 to 1915, and then again in 1925–1929, and the half eagle from 1908 to 1916, and then again in 1929. The pieces remain the only US circulating coins with recessed designs. The coins were the final ones for these denominations as coins struck for circulation, ending series which had begun in the 1790s.

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